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The Armorial Bearings of the City of Carlisle
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thus recorded the defects our ancestors discovered in the old governing body of Carlisle, and the new broom that was invented, when the old Corporation was swept into limbo.

   The Reformed Corporation of Carlisle, in the hot zeal of 1835, discarded many good things which had belonged to their predecessors, and dropped many good customs which their predecessors had loved to maintain. Among other good things which they discarded, they discarded the armorial bearings which their predecessors had used, and they adopted a shield, now familiar to us, not then new, but to which the unreformed Corporation had never but once, by employing it, given sanction. It is blazoned as

   “Vert, a castle between two roses or; on a chief gules, a lion passant guardant of the second, the base wavy argent and sable (or azure, which seems the more modern usage.”)

Or, more particularly,

   “Vert, the base wavy of six argent and azure, thereon a castle between to roses or; on a chief gules, a lion passant guardant of the fourth.”

   The lion might be simply blazoned as “a lion of England,” or even the whole chief as a “chief of England,” for it is taken from the Royal Arms of England, with a view to earmark the achievement as that of an English city. The whole composition is often explained to mean an English city standing in a green meadow on the brink of a river; or on three rivers, Eden, Petteril, and Caldew. This last idea, however, falls to the ground, for the older examples of this coat are always wavy of four pieces only, not of six. That

 

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